Reagan Library Closure

We're sorry. Due to the coronavirus public health emergency, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum will be closed to the public beginning March 14th until further notice. This includes docents, volunteers and interns. We will continue to respond to written reference requests at reagan.library@nara.gov. Please check our website, reaganlibrary.gov or www.archives.gov/coronavirus  for updates on our operating hours and status.

All public events at the Reagan Library facilities are cancelled until further notice. This includes in-person public programs, tours, school group visits, public meetings, external conferences, and facility rentals. Where possible, we will conduct public events and outreach activities online and through virtual meetings. For online education information, please see our educational resources.

Notice to NARA Researchers and FOIA Requestors

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of our staff.  As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgment as well as a substantive response to your reference or FOIA request or appeal.  We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.  Read more on how NARA is addressing COVID-19 (coronavirus) https://www.archives.gov/coronavirus


 

Remarks on Signing the Japan-United States Science and Technology Cooperation Agreement

June 20, 1988

The President. Prime Minister Takeshita and I have just signed a new agreement on cooperation in research and development in science and technology. This agreement provides for joint initiatives to strengthen our bilateral science and technology relationship. It's based on the principles of mutual and equitable contributions and benefits. In it, we set forth the policy framework for this overall relationship. Our hope is to strengthen the relationship for peaceful purposes.

The United States and Japan have a long history of scientific and technological cooperation. This cooperation has benefited both our nations. It has included joint government-to-government research projects, exchanges of students and scholars, and private industry research. When we look to the future, it is clear that science and technology will grow even more important to our mutual well-being. With this in mind, and recognizing the great contributions both of our scientific establishments have to offer to world prosperity, we seek to enhance cooperation in a number of research areas of national importance. Under this agreement we will establish a joint high-level committee to meet at least annually for the purpose of reviewing matters of importance in the field of science and technology. This joint committee will also review and discuss policy issues related to the overall science and technology relationship between our two countries and the cooperative activities under this agreement. I might add that this new agreement is already bearing fruit, and I thank the Prime Minister for his efforts in this regard.

Thank you, and God bless you.

The Prime Minister. It is my deep pleasure to join you, Mr. President, in signing this Japan-U.S. Science and Technology Cooperation Agreement. This agreement lifts our sights to the 1990's and beyond, establishing a practical framework for cooperation between Japan and the United States, two leading nations on the cutting edge of the pursuit of new knowledge. I wish to stress that our collaboration under this agreement is not exclusive. It is open to be shared by all the world. Indeed, I cherish the hope that our joint endeavors, particularly on the frontiers of advanced science and technology, will bear rich fruit and will contribute significantly, not only to the well-being of our two peoples, but also to peaceful progress and prosperity throughout the world. I offer my sincere appreciation to you, Mr. President, and I extend my warm thanks to all those in both our nations whose vision and efforts have shaped this important understanding.

Thank you.

Note: The President spoke at 4:43 p.m. in the ballroom at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto, Canada. The Prime Minister spoke in Japanese, and his remarks were translated by an interpreter.