Reagan Library Closure

We're sorry. Due to the coronavirus public health emergency, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum will be closed to the public beginning March 14th until further notice. This includes docents, volunteers and interns. We will continue to respond to written reference requests at reagan.library@nara.gov. Please check our website, reaganlibrary.gov or www.archives.gov/coronavirus  for updates on our operating hours and status.

All public events at the Reagan Library facilities are cancelled until further notice. This includes in-person public programs, tours, school group visits, public meetings, external conferences, and facility rentals. Where possible, we will conduct public events and outreach activities online and through virtual meetings. For online education information, please see our educational resources.

Notice to NARA Researchers and FOIA Requestors

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of our staff.  As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgment as well as a substantive response to your reference or FOIA request or appeal.  We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.  Read more on how NARA is addressing COVID-19 (coronavirus) https://www.archives.gov/coronavirus


 

 

Message to the House of Representatives Returning Without Approval an Amendment to the Contract Disputes Act of 1978

October 15, 1982

To the House of Representatives:

I am returning without my approval H.R. 1371, a bill ``To amend section 12 of the Contract Disputes Act of 1978.''

H.R. 1371 would require the Federal Government to pay interest to contractors on claims in excess of $50,000 without regard to the date the claims are certified, as now required by section 6(c) of the Contract Disputes Act. The bill would also require the Secretary of the Treasury to determine interest rates to be paid contractors, taking into account the rates of interest on current commercial loans maturing in approximately five years.

The payment of interest by the Government on contractual claims has a long history. Traditionally, the Government's sovereign immunity has barred interest payments unless the terms of a specific statute or contract required it. Among other reforms suggested by the Commission on Government Procurement in 1972 was a recommendation that the Federal Government pay interest on contractual claims. As a result of this recommendation, Congress passed the Contract Disputes Act of 1978.

I have no objection to the language in H.R. 1371 concerning the way in which interest rates on contractual claims against the Government are determined. I strongly object, however, to other language in the bill that would amend the Contract Disputes Act to require that interest on a claim run from the time a claim is submitted without regard to the date of certification of the contractor's claim. This provision is inconsistent with the purpose of the certification requirement of the Contract Disputes Act. That requirement is intended to discourage the submission of inflated claims against the Government by requiring contractors to certify that their claims are made in good faith and are accurate and complete to the best of their knowledge.

By permitting interest to run from the date a claim is submitted, instead of from the date of certification, as current law provides, H.R. 1371 could result in a large increase in Governmental obligations without any corresponding benefits to the claims resolution process so carefully established in the Contract Disputes Act. For this reason, and considering that there have been no hearings or studies conducted addressing the need for such a substantial departure from existing law, I find the bill unacceptable.

Ronald Reagan

The White House,

October 15, 1982.