Celebrating the 19th Amendment/Closure Notices

On August 6, join AmericasTownHall virtual celebration "The 19th at 100!" Presented with All in Together, 19th News, the US National Archives, and presidential libraries, a group of women luminaries, and other leading figures will discuss the past, present, and future of women’s equality. The celebration occurs on August 6, 4:00 pm-6:00 pm PDT, to register for this free online event, please see the invitation at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/19th-amendment-past-present-and-future-tick...

LIBRARY CLOSURE

We're sorry. Due to the coronavirus public health emergency, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum will be closed to the public beginning March 14th until further notice. This includes docents, volunteers and interns. We will continue to respond to written reference requests at reagan.library@nara.gov. Please check our website, reaganlibrary.gov or www.archives.gov/coronavirus  for updates on our operating hours and status.

All public events at the Reagan Library facilities are cancelled until further notice. This includes in-person public programs, tours, school group visits, public meetings, external conferences, and facility rentals. Where possible, we will conduct public events and outreach activities online and through virtual meetings. For online education information, please see our educational resources.

Notice to NARA Researchers and FOIA Requestors

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of our staff.  As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgment as well as a substantive response to your reference or FOIA request or appeal.  We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.  Read more on how NARA is addressing COVID-19 (coronavirus) https://www.archives.gov/coronavirus

RESEARCHERS: Please see a "Letter to Researchers" from the Archivist of the United States for a further update.

 


 

 

Proclamations, November 23, 1983

Proclamation 5128 -- National Disabled Veterans Week, 1983

November 23, 1983

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

All too often, we take for granted the freedoms that we enjoy. We must be ever mindful, however, of the sacrifices made by those men and women who have served in our Nation's armed forces in defense of those freedoms. We especially owe a debt of gratitude to those veterans who became disabled in the service of our country, for they truly know the price of freedom. Daily, these selfless men and women must endure hardship and lost opportunities because of the sacrifices they have made. We must accord them the respect and honor that they deserve.

We must also recognize the significant contributions these special men and women have made. Both in military service and in civilian life, they have been a source of inspiration and admiration, overcoming adversity with pride and dignity.

It is most fitting, therefore, that the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 283, has designated the week beginning November 6, 1983, as ``National Disabled Veterans Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning November 6, 1983, as National Disabled Veterans Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:49 a.m., November 23, 1983]

Proclamation 5129 -- Florence Crittenton Mission Week, 1983

November 23, 1983

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

This year marks one hundred years of outstanding public service to young women by the Florence Crittenton Mission organization. In 1883, Charles Nelson Crittenton of New York opened his first mission which, in the words of its original Congressional charter, was to assist troubled young women to "seek reformation of character . . . (and) to reach positions of honorable self-support'' and thereby make a new start in life.

The Florence Crittenton Mission today has grown to a network of 39 agencies in 26 States. It has achieved distinction in providing a wide range of services to young women, from residential care to career counseling.

The Congress, by House Joint Resolution 383, has designated the week beginning November 6, 1983 as ``Florence Crittenton Mission Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning November 6, 1983, as Florence Crittenton Mission Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:50 a.m., November 23, 1983]

Proclamation 5130 -- Anti-Defamation League Day, 1983

November 23, 1983

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Since its inception, the Anti-Defamation League has worked to strengthen the democratic underpinnings of American society and to establish a harmonious unity of friendship and understanding amidst this Nation's religious, racial, and ethnic diversity. The Anti-Defamation League has combatted, counteracted, and worked to educate the public against anti-Semitism, racism, and the extremists of totalitarianism. The Anti-Defamation League also has articulated the special concerns and interests of the American Jewish community in upholding human rights and civil liberties in this country and throughout the world and served as an effective advocate for friendship with Israel.

The Anti-Defamation League and its leaders and supporters set an example of leadership and participation in events and programs to affect the well-being and future of all people. In purpose and program, the Anti-Defamation League espouses and fulfills the highest ideals and aspiration of Americans of all faiths, races, and cultural origins.

The Congress, by House Joint Resolution 408, has designated November 12, 1983, as ``Anti-Defamation League Day'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim November 12, 1983, as Anti-Defamation League Day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:51 a.m., November 23, 1983]