Reagan Library Closure

We're sorry. Due to the coronavirus public health emergency, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum will be closed to the public beginning March 14th until further notice. This includes docents, volunteers and interns. We will continue to respond to written reference requests at reagan.library@nara.gov. Please check our website, reaganlibrary.gov or www.archives.gov/coronavirus  for updates on our operating hours and status.

All public events at the Reagan Library facilities are cancelled until further notice. This includes in-person public programs, tours, school group visits, public meetings, external conferences, and facility rentals. Where possible, we will conduct public events and outreach activities online and through virtual meetings. For online education information, please see our educational resources.

Notice to NARA Researchers and FOIA Requestors

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and pursuant to guidance received from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), NARA has adjusted its normal operations to balance the need of completing its mission-critical work while also adhering to the recommended social distancing for the safety of our staff.  As a result of this re-prioritization of activities, you may experience a delay in receiving an initial acknowledgment as well as a substantive response to your reference or FOIA request or appeal.  We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience.  Read more on how NARA is addressing COVID-19 (coronavirus) https://www.archives.gov/coronavirus


 

Message on the Observance of Labor Day, 1985

September 1, 1985

On this Labor Day, I proudly join my fellow citizens in saluting our Nation's working men and women.

As we celebrate the historic role of our nation's free labor movement, we are reminded that workers have contributed as much to America's social greatness as they have to our economic strength. Their dedication to humanitarian goals, conscientious craftsmanship and technical excellence have improved virtually every aspect of our lives -- from jobs and working conditions to education, national defense, housing, medical care and transportation. Because of the quality of the goods and services they produce, we enjoy one of the highest standards of living in the world.

Labor Day, 1985, finds the American wage earner better off than in many years, with inflation down, a vibrant economy creating many opportunities, and employment running at record levels. But we must not slacken in our efforts to resolve the continuing problems facing those whose skills have become obsolete and young people seeking entry level jobs. Labor and management must also work hand in hand to improve the position of American products in foreign markets. Increased exports means more jobs for American workers, more growth, more opportunity. Doing its part, this Administration is committed to keeping open foreign markets and removing obstacles to free trade.

These challenges require the best efforts of all of us because we all have a stake in the success of these efforts. By shaping a better future for our workers, we can and will assure continued progress and even greater opportunity for all Americans.

Ronald Reagan